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Digging Deeper

 

The Non-GMO Projects is an independent verification certification created by retailers. The bill introduced by a Republican congressman would create a similar certification by the USDA.
The Non-GMO Projects is an independent verification certification created by retailers. The bill introduced by a Republican congressman would create a similar certification by the USDA.

A Kansas congressman reintroduced a bill Wednesday outlawing state GMO labeling laws, an effort critics promptly called “Monsanto’s dream bill.”

Rep. Mike Pompeo, a Republican, brought back a revised version of the legislation that he offered last year that seeks to roll back states’ efforts to require mandatory labeling of genetically-modified organisms in food products. Pompeo’s bill, which has bipartisan support with nine Republicans and eight Democrats, is backed by a powerful coalition of food companies and manufacturers, including the Grocery Manufacturers Association.

Introduction of the bill sets up a battle between those who support the industry effort against the Democratic coalition of lawmakers that supports labeling. Several Democrats, along with celebrity chef Tom Colicchio, have introduced a bill that directs the FDA to require food manufacturers to label foods with GMO ingredients.

(Bigstock)
(Bigstock)

One of those wonky academic reports made for some good headlines recently.

Seems those crop insurance programs created last year by the 2014 Farm Bill – the ones that were supposed to save taxpayers bunches of money – are actually going to be very costly.

Thanks to low crop prices, the U.S. Baseline Briefing Book found that government payouts will spike in 2015, as Reuters reported.

Another way to look at it: the 2014 Farm Bill was the costliest ever, as read by Environmental Working Group, which was opposed to the new source of subsidies in the form of crop insurance.

The Golden Ox, which closed in December, was located on the first floor of the Livestock Exchange Building. (Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media)
The Golden Ox, which closed in December, was located on the first floor of the Livestock Exchange Building. (Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media)

I had lunch at the Golden Ox just a couple days before the old steakhouse closed in December.

The Golden Ox is set smack dab in the Kansas City Stockyards, now long closed, but which for 120 years churned out billions of pounds of beef.

As the name would suggest, the Golden Ox is not a place of, well, subtleties. There were large aerial black-and-white photos of the stockyards in the entry way, the brass sconces were shaped as cow skulls and the specially-made carpets have a wagon wheel design.

The Kansas City Stockyards went the way of other meatpacking towns, like Omaha and Chicago, all long gone. With them goes a way of life we now only know from history books and exhibits like the one at the Kansas City Public Library.

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