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Digging Deeper

 

Prices for shelled eggs at the grocery store have more than doubled in some areas (Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media)
Prices for shelled eggs at the grocery store have more than doubled in some areas (Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media)

Most bakers and restaurants affected by the current egg shortage brought on by the huge outbreak of bird flu in the Midwest are making their way through the summer by paying higher prices or cutting back on production.

But what if the current crisis brought lasting change? A silver lining in a shell?

Maisie Ganzler, vice president of strategy for Bon Appétit Management Co., believes that the steps the company is taking now to reduce egg usage in their supply chain will stick around for the long haul.

(Flickr)

Whenever I mention to friends and family that I’ve been covering the huge outbreak of bird flu, the first question they ask is: are eggs and poultry still safe to eat?

The short answer: yes. The longer answer: it’s up to you to keep your food safe.

During the last couple months, the numbers of highly pathogenic avian influenza, the H5 virus, have steadily increased. As of Monday, there have been 278 detections in 20 states, according to the USDA.

A sign at one of the gates of Sunset Farms in Harris, Iowa, which is infected with avian flu. (Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media)

The avian influenza virus is moving fast and it’s already the largest outbreak ever in the U.S.

Since the beginning of May, we’ve watched and Tweeted what the U.S. Department of Agriculture has titled “ALL Findings” of bird flu. The updates come daily, about 3 p.m. Central, from a page run by the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

 

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